shepardtsoni

nobodyontheice:

peach94:

COOL DATE IDEA: take a really long nap with me

Scientifically and psychologically speaking, long periods of physical contact or just closeness stimulate chemicals in the brain that promote trust. If you’ve ever slept while cuddling somebody you just met, you know how incredibly comfortable you feel with them after you wake up, as if you’ve known each other for years. So yes, a long nap together is actually the ideal date if your goal is a relationship based on trust.

blogallthefandoms

most-creative-url:

Lucifer must return in season 10 and here’s why:

  1. image

    On August 1st it will be five years from this line in “The End”
  2. image

    Because there’s literally know way this can just be coincidence i mean really
  3. This gem is on Mark Pellegrino’s Wikipedia pageimage
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  5. Cas is running out of grace and he didn’t have any in this episode 
  6. Demon Dean can access hell
  7. Come on they need to go get Adam its been 5 seasons 
  8. Please we all miss him
cassastark
brookhavenlab:

Supernova remnants are impossibly stunning. Exploding stars fling a ridiculous amount of energy out across the cosmos, giving us killer images like the one above.
But supernovae also send out extremely energetic charged particles, which can strike and damage cells. Ol’ Mother Earth protects us with a luscious atmosphere and powerful magnetic field, but deep space explorers aren’t so lucky. Astronauts traveling beyond Earth’s orbit are exposed to these powerful, star-born cosmic rays. So how do we protect them and evaluate the risks?

Well, clearly you can’t just send a person out into space and see how long it takes them to develop cancer. So what we work with at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory are many experiments with different cell types that we expose to this type of radiation here on Earth—and then we use a lot of mathematical manipulations to extrapolate our data into the health risks for people.

That’s molecular biologist Peter Guida in a great Popular Mechanics (popmech) interview on the threat to Mars explorers. Guida works at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory here at Brookhaven Lab, using our accelerators to safely simulate the ion beams blazing through deep space. Go read the whole thing.

brookhavenlab:

Supernova remnants are impossibly stunning. Exploding stars fling a ridiculous amount of energy out across the cosmos, giving us killer images like the one above.

But supernovae also send out extremely energetic charged particles, which can strike and damage cells. Ol’ Mother Earth protects us with a luscious atmosphere and powerful magnetic field, but deep space explorers aren’t so lucky. Astronauts traveling beyond Earth’s orbit are exposed to these powerful, star-born cosmic rays. So how do we protect them and evaluate the risks?

Well, clearly you can’t just send a person out into space and see how long it takes them to develop cancer. So what we work with at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory are many experiments with different cell types that we expose to this type of radiation here on Earth—and then we use a lot of mathematical manipulations to extrapolate our data into the health risks for people.

That’s molecular biologist Peter Guida in a great Popular Mechanics (popmechinterview on the threat to Mars explorers. Guida works at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory here at Brookhaven Lab, using our accelerators to safely simulate the ion beams blazing through deep space. Go read the whole thing.